Lancelot Andrewes

Posted: 16th April 2008 by ElShaddai Edwards in Uncategorized

I’m continuing to make progress through Harold Best’s “Unceasing Worship” book and hope to have a few more posts or thoughts on some of the content found therein. However, in the meantime, he’s recommended a book of prayers called “The Private Devotions of Lancelot Andrewes” as “an exhaustive collection of all kinds of prayers, all written by Andrewes and used by him. The prayers are intricate, passionate and schematically ingenious.” This comes in a section of Best’s book about prayer and the benefits of crafting an “eloquent and clear prayer” that takes in “the whole of [your] spiritual and theological vocabulary.”

Evidently Andrewes (1555-1626) was one of the translators of the KJV. In the endnotes, Best recommends a 1961 edition of the prayer book translated by F.E. Brightman that also contains an essay by T.S. Eliot. Amazon also lists editions translated by Alexander Whyte, David Scott and John Henry Newman, among others.

Is anyone familiar with this book of prayers, and is there any qualitative difference between translators that would justify the quantitative difference between $50 (Brightman) and $5 (Whyte)?

  1. Iyov says:

    E-S —

    I’m confused. You can download both Brightman’s and Whyte’s translations for free from both archive.org and books.google.com. And here is a link to the Eliot essay. So, the cost is . . . free.

    Let me know if you have any trouble finding them. I’d give you the links here, but I know from bitter experience that would only block my comment as spam. Note that Brightman’s translation is published as The Preces Privatae of Lancelot Andrewes.

    Happy reading.

  2. Ah, thank you, Iyov! Free is best – at least until I decide that holding a dusty old tome is worth something… Seriously, thanks for the info – I’ll search those sites for both.

  3. Thanks also for the link, Doug. I apologize for only now recovering your post from WordPress’ spam purgatory. Why it went there with only one hyperlink, we shall never know…